Using Compression Therapy for Exercise-Induced Edema

By Game Ready | Dec 05, 2017

Many athletes experience a condition known as exercise-induced edema after working out. You might not be familiar with this term, but chances are you will recognize the symptoms. Have you ever had trouble taking off a ring after going for a run? Do your feet and ankles swell after athletic activity? These might be symptoms of exercise-induced edema.

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Why Active Cold & Compression Is Critical to Back Strain Treatment

By Game Ready | Nov 18, 2014

Back strain, sometimes also called a pulled back muscle, is both painful and inconvenient. It can be caused by a number of factors, including a fall, improper lifting, twisting unexpectedly, or repeatedly bending over. If left untreated, it can lead to inability to perform certain movements, which can impact your daily life. Fortunately, in most cases, back strain is fully treatable.

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Why Ice Water Therapy Alone Won’t Speed Up Muscle Recovery

By Kelly Hansen | May 15, 2014
Cold (cryo) therapy is widely used after a musculoskeletal injury or post-surgery to decrease pain, muscle spasms, edema and swelling. Let’s say you’ve had an ankle or knee injury. You know the drill – get in bed or on the couch, elevate the leg and apply ice to the injured area. You also remember the mess and inconvenience this kind of ice water therapy causes – wet pillows, bedclothes, blankets, etc. Staying compliant with that type of cold therapy is really difficult and that’s just one reason why ice water therapy alone isn’t ideal for recovering from a sports injury.
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Experiencing Tennis Elbow Symptoms? 5 Ways to Recover Quickly

By Kelly Hansen | Apr 28, 2014

Tennis elbow results from overuse of muscles in the forearm and hand. Although the injury is common in tennis players, it is not exclusive to them. Anybody can get tennis elbow when the muscles and tendons surrounding the joint become torn or ruptured.

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The 4 Most Common Upper Extremity Injuries and Symptoms

By Kelly Hansen | Mar 31, 2014

Upper extremity injuries can happen to anybody, but they are most commonly related to falling onto an outstretched hand. Athletes and professionals who do repetitive motions with their hands and wrists are also at higher risk of these types of injuries. 

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Common Complications of Upper Extremity Surgery Recovery & How to Avoid Them

By Kelly Hansen | Feb 20, 2014

Although modern medicine has come a long way, complications during or after surgery are not uncommon. However, even the most minor complications should be addressed to ensure that you heal properly and completely.

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How to Have a Quick Upper Extremity Surgery Recovery

By Kelly Hansen | Feb 14, 2014

If you are planning an upper extremity surgery to the hand, wrist, arm, or shoulder, a speedy recovery is probably one of your top priorities. Not being able to use an upper extremity can be very inconvenient, especially if you live alone or if your work requires the use of your injured arm.

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6 Things You Need for Post-Op Knee Surgery

By Kelly Hansen | Dec 12, 2013
Getting injured is always a nasty surprise, but after the initial shock there is much you can do to plan for a faster recovery. Being prepared for post-op knee surgery is the best way to ensure that you have everything you need to get back on your feet as fast as possible.

So what do you need to be safe and comfortable for post-op knee surgery?

6 Things You Need After Knee Surgery

  1. Rest - After knee surgery you need to rest both your knee and your body. Limiting activity and getting ample sleep will allow your body to dedicate as much energy as possible to repairing itself. This is especially important in the first several days after surgery. If necessary, change your schedule to accommodate less activity.

  2. Healthy food - Your body will need all the valuable nutrients it can get during the recovery process. Focus on good nutrition with balanced meals that are rich in vitamins and minerals.

  3. Pain medication - Your doctor will likely prescribe some pain medication, especially for the initial stages of post-op knee surgery. Maintain an open line of communication to ensure that you get the right types and amounts of medication during this time.

  4. Cold compression therapy - Active cold and compression combine two important therapies for faster healing. This type of therapy can also reduce pain and swelling immediately after knee surgery, so be sure to talk to your doctor about your options before you go in for surgery.

  5. Physical therapy - Although you need to get ample rest, you must also participate in a physical therapy program that will help you regain full range of motion. Your physical therapist will also prescribe exercises that will help rebuild stability, strength, and flexibility.

  6. Knee brace - Post-op knee braces are designed to completely immobilize the joint after surgery. After the initial healing phase, you can wear a brace that allows more mobility. Your doctor and physical therapist can help you decide which type of brace is right for you.

Of course, you might also want to plan for some entertainment in the first few weeks after surgery while you need to rest your knee as much as possible. You should also think about how your house is laid out and make any necessary provisions. For example, consider temporarily living on only the first level of your home to avoid stairs as much as possible.

Work with your doctor and physical therapist to ensure that you have everything you need before your knee surgery. Pick up any prescriptions you will need, select a knee brace that fits, and make sure you have a cold and compression system reserved for your physical therapy sessions. You can also rent a system to keep at home during your recovery. Find a Game Ready provider near you to get started.

What else might you need for post-op knee surgery?

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3 Activities to Avoid During MCL Surgery Recovery

By Kelly Hansen | Dec 05, 2013

There are many activities you should try to do during MCL surgery recovery. For example, getting plenty of rest, using cold and compression therapy, and following the recommendations from your physical therapist. However, there are also several that you should avoid if you want to ensure the fastest recovery possible.

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The 8 Most Common Football Injuries

By Kelly Hansen | Jun 17, 2013

Like with all sports, football comes with the risk of injury. In fact, football has the highest risk of injury compared to other sports. One of the reasons for this elevated risk is that football is a high-impact sport. Tackling, blocking, and other physical interactions between players can result in contusions, concussions, and other common injuries.

Another reason football injuries are so common is simply the nature of the game. Players must frequently pivot and change direction, increasing the likelihood of injuries to the joints and other tissues. Sudden bursts of speed can cause muscle damage if the player is not properly warmed up. Overuse injuries are also common, particularly for quarterbacks.

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