Hip Flexor Pain: Causes, Treatment, and Prevention

By Game Ready | Feb 08, 2017

The hip flexors are a group of three muscles that work together to allow you to bend at the hip or lift a leg. They also act as stabilizing muscles for the legs and lower back. Because they work with other major muscle groups, injuries to the hip flexors can be painful and limit range of movement, which leads to limited mobility during recovery.

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The Most Convenient Ways to Relieve Muscular Pain

By Game Ready | Jun 01, 2016

Frozen peas, bags of ice, and gel packs are some of the most common ways to apply cold for relieving muscular pain. However, they are not exactly convenient. Ice melts, peas get mushy, and all of these options get cold and wet on the outside, especially if you have a leaky ice bag. Most people also use a cloth or towel to protect their skin from getting an ice burn, because that level of cold directly on the skin is too intense, or to soak up the uncomfortable wetness.

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6 Tips for Hip Flexor Pain Treatment

By Game Ready | Aug 19, 2015

The hip flexors are a collection of muscles that work together to allow you to flex your hip joint, which includes actions like bending at the waist and lifting your knees. The primary muscles required for hip flexion are the psoas major and the iliacus muscle, commonly known as the iliopsoas, and the rectus femoris and sartorius. In addition to these primary movers, some of the gluteal and adductor muscles are also engaged.

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Expedite Your Knee Surgery Recovery with Cold Compression Therapy

By Kelly Hansen | Apr 11, 2013

Like any other surgery, knee surgery results in pain and inflammation that can cause discomfort for the patient. The more quickly the healing process happens, the faster you can reduce or eliminate these undesirable effects. Fortunately, it is possible to expedite knee surgery recovery with cold compression therapy.

The efficacy of cold compression therapy is well proven. In the case of knee surgery recovery, the combination of these two therapies has the following effects: 

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Six Ways to Prepare for Life During Back Surgery Recovery

By Kelly Hansen | Apr 08, 2013
Recovering from back surgery can be a difficult process, but there are ways that you can make it easier. It's important to know what to expect before you go into surgery, so talk to your health care provider and make sure you understand the physical limitations you will be facing. The most important step you can take to make life easier after such a major health event is to prepare for back surgery recovery in advance.

Six Ways to Make Back Surgery Recovery Easier

The more prepared you are, the smoother your recovery will be. Follow these tips to help you get ready before your back surgery:

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How Cryotherapy Systems Reduce Pain and Swelling

By Kelly Hansen | Mar 21, 2013

What should you do when you suffer a musculoskeletal injury such as a sprained wrist or a strained back?  Most people are advised to rest, apply ice and compression, and temporarily, elevate the injury site if possible (not so easy with a back strain). This technique, known as RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation), is widely used in sports medicine today.

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Key Advantages of Using Cryotherapy Systems to Heal Sports Injuries

By Kelly Hansen | Mar 18, 2013

Cryotherapy – also called cold therapy – has been used for many years to treat the aftereffects of a soft tissue musculoskeletal injury. If you’ve ever twisted your ankle or had to do post-op rehabilitation for a knee ligament repair, you may have been advised to follow the RICE (Rest-Ice-Compression-Elevation) regimen. Traditional ice application methods typically include use of an ice bucket (doesn’t work on many joint injuries, such as the back or hip), wrapping the injury with a plastic bag filled with crushed ice, or using an ace wrap over the ice-filled bag to try and provide some compression along with the cryotherapy. These methods are inconvenient, messy, irritating and hard to stick with over time. And when you don’t stay with a regimen of cryotherapy and compression, you recover more slowly from your sports injury.

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Post-Surgery Treatment Options for Below the Knee Amputation

By Kelly Hansen | Mar 14, 2013

Limb amputations in the U.S. occur for a variety of reasons. The most common is a vascular problem such as diabetes or peripheral vascular disease, accounting for 82 percent of all lower extremity amputations. Trauma is the second most common reason, and affects more men than women. The leading causes of trauma-related lower extremity amputations are machinery injuries (40%), powered tools and appliances (28%), firearms (9%) and car accidents (8%).

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5 Ways to Accelerate Amputation Rehabilitation With Active Cold Compression

By Kelly Hansen | Mar 11, 2013

If you’re one of the two million people in the U.S. living with the loss of a limb, you know how important physical rehabilitation is for those seeking to recover after an amputation. Therapy helps amputees learn how to adjust and recover as much of their functional life as possible. The good news is that surgical techniques, rehabilitation methods and prosthetic designs have improved greatly, and so most amputees are able to function at high levels.

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Understanding Your ACL Surgery Recovery Timeline

By Kelly Hansen | Mar 07, 2013

Surgery to repair and reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament is often needed because doctors find that an untreated ACL tear leads to knee instability, recurring injury, or damage to other parts of the knee. Vigorous people who want to regain a physically-active life often opt for ACL surgery and commit to the required physical therapy. Rehab following ACL surgery isn’t quick and easy; fortunately, excellent rehab technologies are available, such as one that combines cold and compression therapy to speed up ACL surgery recovery.

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