The First Four Weeks: How to Make the Most From Rotator Cuff Surgery Recovery

By Kelly Hansen | Dec 11, 2012

A rotator cuff injury happens fairly commonly to people, especially if they’re over 40 years old and working in a job that requires lots of overhead arm and shoulder movement, such as construction or painting professions. Athletes, too, particularly swimmers, baseball pitchers and tennis players are prone to a rotator cuff tear. Once your physician diagnoses you with a rotator cuff injury, you’ll either undergo a non-surgical treatment or you may need surgery if other treatments don’t relieve the pain, muscle atrophy and weakness most often associated with this type of injury.

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